Egypt and Jordan / Luxor
Egypt
Luxor
Egypt and Jordan / Luxor Museum
Egypt
Luxor Museum
Egypt and Jordan / King Horemheb Worshipping Amun
Egypt
King Horemheb Worshipping Amun
Egypt and Jordan / Karnak Temple
Egypt
Karnak Temple
Egypt and Jordan / Temple of Queen Hatshepsut
Egypt
Temple of Queen Hatshepsut

Luxor

Luxor is often referred to as the world's largest open-air museum. It contains a vast collection of temples and tombs and is second only to the Pyramids in its historic importance to Egypt. Called Luxor today, it was once known, when it was the ancient capital, as Thebes (the name was changed to Al-Uqsor, "The Fortifications" by the Arabs, which became Luxor).

The city is divided by the Nile and great treasures sit on either side of the river. On the East Bank is the glorious Luxor Temple and also the vast and sprawling Karnak temple complex. Karnak was the heart of Thebes; known as Ipet-Isut, "The Most Perfect of Places," it was added to by pharaoh after pharaoh, and during the nineteenth dynasty, 80,000 men are said to have worked on it. The East Bank is also home to the Luxor Museum, where you can see artifacts and statues from surrounding tombs and also mummies.

On the West Bank is the Valley of the Kings, the royal Theban necropolis. Sixty-three tombs have been found thus far in the Valley of the Kings, including the most famous to date, Tutankhamun's tomb. The tombs are remarkable works of art, filled with bas-reliefs and paintings. Also on the West Bank is the Valley of the Queens, which includes the tomb of Queen Nefertari.

For many centuries, the great treasures of Luxor laid buried under the sands- it was only with the coming of archeologists in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries that much began to be revealed. Today the work remains ongoing in a site where you will find colossi and ancient stonework everywhere you turn, in a place where the past feels more present than the present.

 

Luxor