Southeast Asia and Japan / Chaukhtatgyi Paya
Myanmar
Chaukhtatgyi Paya
Southeast Asia and Japan / Burmese Smiles
Myanmar
Burmese Smiles
Southeast Asia and Japan / The Governors Residence
Myanmar
The Governors Residence
Southeast Asia and Japan / Burmese Monkey & Infant
Myanmar
Burmese Monkey & Infant
Southeast Asia and Japan / Shwedagon Pagoda
Myanmar
Shwedagon Pagoda
Southeast Asia and Japan / Burmese Lacquerware
Myanmar
Burmese Lacquerware

Yangon

Different times in Myanmar's history have brought different capitals: First it was Bagan, then Mandalay and then, with the coming of colonial rule, the British shifted the country's capital to Yangon (which the British called Rangoon). While the capital has again shifted and Yangon no longer remains the government seat of power, Yangon is still Myanmar's largest and best-known city and a must-see for travelers to the country. Yangon is a wide, open city, filled with large boulevards, trees and parks and classic colonial-era buildings. It is also home to extraordinary Burmese temples, including the most famous of them all, the Shwedagon Pagoda. As Ralph Fitch, the first Englishman to arrive in Myanmar, remarked after seeing it in 1558, "[It] is of a wonderful bigness, and all gilded from the foot to the topped. It is the fairest place, as I suppose, that is in the world." Shwedagon is said to house relics of four Buddhas. Its incredibly ornate stupa is crowned with a 76-carat diamond.

Yangon is filled with numerous other sites for travelers to explore. The reclining Buddha statue at the Chaukhtatgyi Pagoda is over two hundred feet long, done in a typically ornate Burmese style; on the soles of the Buddha's feet are carved 108 sacred symbols of the Buddha.

Also not to be missed in Yangon is the Bogyoke Aung San Market, the most famous market in the city, home to a huge selection of crafts made by Myanmar's artisans, including lacquerware, carvings, tapestries, fabrics and jewelry.

Antipodes recommends

The Strand Hotel
The Governor's Residence

 

Yangon